STUDY OF RICE HUSK, EUCALYPTUS CHIPS AND LEATHER SHAVINGS AS FEEDSTOCK FOR POWER GENERATION BY CO-FIRING  



Autores: Evelin M. S. Castro¹, Luiz A. M. Fontoura², Guilherme P. S. Priebe, Guilherme De Souza³

 

There is an increasing interest on the use of renewable and alternative solid fuels such as biomass derived from wastes generated by industry. The potential for using vegetable and animal-derived residues such as rice husk, eucalyptus chips and leather shavings as feedstock for cogeneration processes was investigated in the present work. The feedstocks were characterized by proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, calorific value and thermogravimetry. The cofiring tests with different coal:biomass ratios were performed by thermogravimetry and by evaluation in a fixed bed reactor placed in a tubular electric furnace. Approximately 20 or 30 wt. % of biomass was mixed with coal derived from the Candiota mine for the cofiring tests. The combustion temperature varied moderately during the cofiring tests performed in a thermobalance in comparison to the combustion of coal. These changes in the ignition temperature were proportional to the biomass loadings. As expected by the proximate analysis, the quantity of ash significantly decreased with increasing biomass loadings in the cofiring tests. The evaluation in the electric furnace was conducted under synthetic air flow with continuous analysis of the gas composition in order to compare the gas emissions of the cofiring and the coal combustion processes. A strong decrease in the emission of SO2 was noticed for the cofiring/combustion of rice husk and eucalyptus chips. These results were expected from the low content of sulfur in these feedstocks compared to coal as revealed by the ultimate analysis. In addition to pointing to the relevance and feasibility of using these biomasses for energy generation by cofiring, results herein reported provided interesting information for conducting these processes in higher scale plants


Keywords: Biomass. Coal. Cofiring. Atmospheric emissions.

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